Can China-Brazil trade keep up its promising momentum

August 25, 2014

Zhang Fan – China Daily, 8/25/2014

The world is facing overwhelming change and the rise of China is among the key factors, said Marcos Troyjo, a Brazilian economist and co-director of the BRICLab at Columbia University, at a conference hosted by Brazilian law firm Demarest in Sao Paulo on Aug 19.

Troyjo said China has entered a new stage, what he calls “China 2.0″. Compared with the 30 years following the county’s Reform and Opening-up policies of 1978, China can now no longer rely on governmental investment and foreign trade to simulate its economic development.

China 2.0 needs to alter its economic development, reduce overproduction and enlarge its importation, said Troyjo, which could mean great opportunities for Brazilian industries.

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China Touts Its Importance In Brazil

August 19, 2014

Kenneth Rapoza – Forbes, 8/18/2014

Chinese diplomats in São Paulo reminded the locals just how important that country is to Brazil.  And doesn’t Brazil know it.

Four years ago, China became Brazil’s leading trading partner, surpassing the U.S..  So far this year, Brazilian companies, led by commodities exporters, shipped $28 billion worth of goods to China compared to $20 billion to the U.S.

The two BRIC economies “should further advance current ties to make the partnership a model for interaction between developing countries,” Chinese Consul General Chen Xi reportedly said in São Paulo on Aug. 11 during an event to celebrate the 40th anniversary diplomatic ties between China and Brazil. The ceremony was co-hosted by the City Council of Sao Paulo and the Brazil-China Friendship Association. It was attended by about 200 that included entrepreneurs and Chinese and Brazilian officials, the China Daily reported from Brazil’s biggest city.

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China, Brazil look to redirect climate talks

August 11, 2014

Natalie Obiko Pearson – Business Report, 8/11/2014

China and Brazil are looking for ways to redirect the global climate debate, which they say unfairly accuses developing nations of delaying limits on fossil-fuel pollution.

China wants to blitz attendees at UN-led climate talks with pamphlets touting the clean energy gains made by the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide. Brazil wants more recognition for slowing destruction of the planet’s biggest rainforest.

“We must work on how we sell ourselves better, how we sell our positions to the world,” Francisco Gaetani, Brazil’s Deputy Environment Minister, said in Delhi on Friday with counterparts from China, India and South Africa.

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How Russian ban on U.S., E.U. food could turn into a windfall for Brazil

August 11, 2014

Dom Phillips – The Washington Post, 8/9/2014

As relations among Russia, the United States and the European Union deteriorate over the Ukraine crisis, there may be one unexpected winner: Brazil.

On Wednesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree banning a list of agricultural products from the United States, the European Union, Canada, Australia and Norway in response to sanctions levied by the West. No sooner had Russia issued the ban than Brazilian producers were lining up to fill the gap.

“Brazil will substantially increase its meat and dairy exports,” Brazilian Agriculture Minister Neri Geller said in a statement.

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The New Development Bank adds substance to the BRICS

July 30, 2014

Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva – Executive editor of Política Externa, Wilson Center Global Fellow

carlos_eduardo_lins_da_silva-230x310

Its initial landing, projected at US$ 3.6 billion a year starting in 2016, will limit the bank’s impact

The sixth summit of the BRICS took place at a time of low economic growth for the group. The BRICS gained prominence after the global financial crisis of 2008, which put the leading capitalist economies on the brink of the abyss and made room for big emerging countries at the decision making table.

The average growth for the five countries in 2014 is expected to be to around 5%, or half of what was recorded eight years ago, with one important difference: unlike 2008, the large economies are now recovering from higher levels of development when compared with the BRICS.

The group made important institutional progress in its sixth summit, held in the Brazilian city of Fortaleza. The event marked the official launching of the New Development Bank. However, it did not elevate the BRICS to an organization capable of substantially influencing global geopolitics and effectively countering the established economic powers or challenging the apparatus they built after World War II to ensure hegemony in the macroeconomic policy decision making. Read the rest of this entry »


Africa: Brics Summits Make Little Progress On Science Cooperation

July 21, 2014

Fabiola Ortiz – All Africa, 7/21/2014

Scientific cooperation among the BRICS countries lags far behind its potential, according to Brazilian experts speaking after last week’s BRICS summit in Brazil.

The 6th Summit of Heads of State and of Government of BRICS – a multilateral forum of the emerging economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – held in Fortaleza and Brasília (14-16 July) has agreed to set up New Development Bank, which will emphasise social and economic inclusion.

The final declaration reinforces the commitment to strengthening cooperation in science, technology and innovation, and calls for “co-generating new knowledge and innovative products, services and processes utilising appropriate funding and investment instruments”.

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The New Development Bank: The start of a new economic consensus?

July 21, 2014

Erica Kliment – Brazil Institute, 7/21/2014

2014 BRICS Summit in Brazil

The leaders at the 2014 BRICS Summit in Brazil

Is the rest of the world ready for a new order upheld by developing nations? In 2010, when former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva invited then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran to the Itamaraty Palace in Brazil, the meeting was highly criticized by the Obama administration. Lula, who had seemed to enjoy international acclaim when dealing with regional politics, was then chastised when he had reached too far out of the western hemisphere. His response was that he was merely attempting to better situate Brazil on the global stage, yet could the criticism have come from the fact that larger power players did not believe Brazil was ready to graduate from the role of regional babysitter?

Four years later, with an unexpectedly successful World Cup under Brazil’s belt and planning on another fruitful mega-event in just two years, the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the developed world seems slightly more willing to accept developing nations’ role in the international sphere. Individually, these nations’ global clout is diminishing with slowing economic growth rates, yet collectively, they have the potential to create a new platform upon which they and future developing nations can flourish. Towards the close of the most recent BRICS Summit, five of those countries reached an agreement that, depending on its success, could bring developing nations one step closer to the position they desire – the forefront of international affairs.

During the 2014 BRICS Summit in Fortaleza, the leaders of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa jointly created the New Development Bank, a multinational fund of $150 billion in capital to provide stability and finance infrastructure for the five developing nations involved in the negotiations as well as future emerging markets. It will be headquartered in Shanghai with its first president from India, on a five-year rotating schedule, and with Brazil taking chairmanship of the board. Read the rest of this entry »


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