Exclusive: Brazil’s PSDB party would support Silva in runoff

August 20, 2014

Brian Winter – Reuters, 8/20/2014

The Brazilian Social Democracy Party (PSDB), the country’s biggest opposition group, would formally support environmentalist Marina Silva in a runoff vote for the presidency if its own candidate fails to qualify, a party source told Reuters.

Such an alliance would reduce President Dilma Rousseff’s chances of winning a second term by bringing together large, disparate groups of voters who are clamouring for change after more than a decade of Workers’ Party rule.

The election is being closely watched by investors who are also hoping for a change in government after almost four years of stagnant growth and state intervention in the economy under Rousseff’s left-leaning administration.

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Former Brazil President Lula Campaigns for Dilma Rouseff’s Re-election

August 20, 2014

Hispanically Speaking News, 8/19/2014

Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, one of Brazil’s most popular politicians, came all-out Tuesday in favor of the campaign to reelect his successor, Dilma Rousseff, assuring voters they can support her without qualms.

With the campaigns for the Oct. 5 elections starting Tuesday on television, the ideal medium for getting political messages across in Brazil, Lula burst onto the small screen with a powerful message in favor of a second four-year term for his political protege.

“Everyone knows that my second term was better than the first” and “that’s how it will be with Dilma,” Lula said, appealing to what Brazilians remember about his 2003-2011 tenure.

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Silva Economy Adviser Warns Against Brazil Currency Intervention

August 20, 2014

Paula Sambo – Bloomberg, 8/19/2014

Policies to control inflation with a stronger real pose a threat to Brazil’s economy, Eduardo Giannetti, who is economic adviser to potential presidential candidate Marina Silva, said.

“The currency intervention in Dilma’s government was to contain domestic prices,” he said today at an event in Sao Paulo about the administration of Dilma Rousseff, cautioning that he was speaking on his own accord and not as Silva’s adviser. “That is an action that generates distortions and is a worrying framework for the country.”

Silva, 56, became the wild card in Brazilian politics after her running mate, presidential candidate Eduardo Campos, died in a plane crash last week. She replaced Senator Aecio Neves as second in polling for the Oct. 5 vote and is statistically tied with Rousseff in a possible runoff, according to public opinion research company Datafolha.

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Brazil Eases Credit Rules to Inject $4.5 Billion in Economy

August 20, 2014

Matthew Malinowski and Karen Eeuwens – Bloomberg, 8/20/2014

Brazil’s central bank has eased rules on reserve requirement for a second time this quarter in a bid to boost credit in a slowing economy.

The bank published the rules in today’s Official Gazette, altering rules for payments on non-cash deposits. The changes will channel about 10 billion reais ($4.5 billion) into credit, the bank said in a statement published on its website. The move follows the bank’s decision in July to free up 30 billion reais, according to the statement.

President Dilma Rousseff’s administration is struggling to contain above-target inflation without causing growth to deteriorate further. The central bank has kept the benchmark interest-rate at the highest level since 2012, after lifting the key rate by 375 basis points in the year through April. The moves haven’t improved the economic outlook, according to analysts surveyed by the central bank, who forecast growth will slow and inflation will accelerate this year compared to last year.

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Lula urges Brazilians to give Rousseff a second term

August 19, 2014

Fox News Latino, 8/19/2014

Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, one of Brazil’s most popular politicians, came all-out Tuesday in favor of the campaign to reelect his successor, Dilma Rousseff, assuring voters they can support her without qualms.

With the campaigns for the Oct. 5 elections starting Tuesday on television, the ideal medium for getting political messages across in Brazil, Lula burst onto the small screen with a powerful message in favor of a second four-year term for his political protege.

“Everyone knows that my second term was better than the first” and “that’s how it will be with Dilma,” Lula said, appealing to what Brazilians remember about his 2003-2011 tenure.

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Silva surges in Brazil election poll, runoff looks certain

August 19, 2014

Anthony Boadle – Reuters, 8/19/2014

Marina Silva’s entry into Brazil’s presidential race will almost certainly force the October election into a second-round runoff and the environmentalist could even unseat President Dilma Rousseff, according to a poll released on Monday.

It showed Silva with the support of 21 percent of voters, almost three times more than center-left candidate Eduardo Campos, who she is poised to replace on the Brazilian Socialist Party’s ticket after his death last week in a plane crash.

Support for Rousseff in the survey by polling firm Datafolha was unchanged from last month at 36 percent and remained at 20 percent for centrist and market favorite Aecio Neves, showing that Silva’s surge came among voters who were previously undecided.

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The 2014 Brazilian Elections: The current situation

August 19, 2014

Juliana Moraes-Pinheiro – Council on Hemispheric Affairs, 8/18/2014

The 2014 Brazilian elections have demonstrated a series of extraordinary events. Since the end of the authoritarian military dictatorship almost 30 years ago, ordinary Brazilians have increasingly participated in the country’s democratic political process. The practice of politicians “buying votes” with the help of blackmail, along with false promises has become increasingly rare as Brazilians are better informed about their candidates and less skeptical about the country’s electoral system. It is not as easy to manufacture political support as it was in the past.

While Brazil has many political parties, two parties in particular have come to dominate the Brazilian political stage – one leaning left while the other leans to the right. Americans will find this scenario all too familiar, as in the United States; only the two main parties have been able to vie for higher political positions. This bipolar arrangement makes consensus difficult within Brazil’s governing institutions. In this election, a center-left party, the Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB), was ahead by 9% in recent polls. However, with the death of its presidential candidate, Eduardo Campos, in a tragic plane crash, the hopes for change has become far out of reach.

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China Touts Its Importance In Brazil

August 19, 2014

Kenneth Rapoza – Forbes, 8/18/2014

Chinese diplomats in São Paulo reminded the locals just how important that country is to Brazil.  And doesn’t Brazil know it.

Four years ago, China became Brazil’s leading trading partner, surpassing the U.S..  So far this year, Brazilian companies, led by commodities exporters, shipped $28 billion worth of goods to China compared to $20 billion to the U.S.

The two BRIC economies “should further advance current ties to make the partnership a model for interaction between developing countries,” Chinese Consul General Chen Xi reportedly said in São Paulo on Aug. 11 during an event to celebrate the 40th anniversary diplomatic ties between China and Brazil. The ceremony was co-hosted by the City Council of Sao Paulo and the Brazil-China Friendship Association. It was attended by about 200 that included entrepreneurs and Chinese and Brazilian officials, the China Daily reported from Brazil’s biggest city.

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Candidate’s sudden death in plane crash transforms Brazil race

August 19, 2014

CBS News, 8/15/2014

Brazil’s political landscape was being redrawn Thursday, a day after a small plane crash killed a top presidential candidate, possibly complicating President Dilma Rousseff’s effort to win re-election in October.

The late Eduardo Campos’ Socialist Party was widely expected to declare his running mate, Marina Silva, one of the country’s most popular politicians, as its presidential candidate in the coming days.

“If she runs, it becomes a more competitive race. It increases the likelihood of a runoff happening,” said Joao Augusto de Castro Neves, Latin America director for the Eurasia Group consulting firm. “It would be a pretty close race to see who is going to be the runner-up.”

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