The vigor of Brazilian literature

Boston Book Festival – October 24th, 2015 @ 4:00PM


The session marks the world premiere of the English version of an anthology bringing together more than twenty of the best representatives of Brazil’s diverse literature. Three of them will be on stage.

A diplomat and Harvard-trained lawyer, Alexandre Vidal Porto is a representative of Brazil’s new urban school of fiction. He wrote Sergio Y., recipient of the Paraná Literary Prize, to be published in the United States in 2016. In 2009, Nuno Ramos received Brazil’s most prestigious literary prize, the Portugal Telecom Literature Award, with the book Ó. Luisa Geisler was awarded the 2010 Sesc Prize for Literature for her debut book Contos de Mentira and was featured in Granta’s special issue on Best Young Brazilian Writers.

Nilma Dominique, the coordinator of MIT’s Portuguese Language Program, will host the session. During the event there will be a pocket show by Brazilian musician Flavio Lira. Anthology and session (held in English) sponsored by Pessoa magazine, with support from MIT and Boston University.

Click here for more information directly from the BBF website

Rio 2016: one year out Brazil not delayed or over budget, says mayor

Jonathan Watts – The Guardian, 8/5/2015

The Rio mayor, Eduardo Paes, launched a feisty defence of Olympic preparations on Wednesday as the host city marked the one-year countdown to the 2016 Games with a presidential gala and a test rowing event.

Following criticisms of water quality, police violence, forced relocations and excessive benefits to private developers, the mayor countered with a positive vision of how Rio was transforming as a result of the Games.

“I’m doing what mayors before me promised but didn’t deliver,” he told reporters at a press conference in the fencing venue of the Olympic Park. “Don’t come here wanting Swiss, Swedish or Danish levels of development, we are not there – but we have advanced a lot in recent years.”

Read more…

Sailing Federation will test waters for viruses in Brazil’s Olympics venues

Bill Chappell – NPR, 8/1/2015

Saying that recent stories about raw sewage in Brazilian waterways that will serve as Olympics venues in 2016 helped “wake us up again and put this back on the agenda,” the head of sailing’s world governing body says his group will test for viruses and bacteria in the water.

The International Sailing Federation’s chief executive, Peter Sowrey, tells the AP that the move is prompted by concerns over athletes’ health and safety.

The news comes days after the AP published a report on pollution in Rio’s Guanabara Bay, the scene for sailing competitions in next summer’s Olympic Games, and Rodrigo de Freitas lake, which will host rowing and canoeing events.

Read more…

Natural energy, artistic development, harmony, and the future of Brazil

Watch EmeraldPlanet’s video here, 7/12/2015


Denise Milan, Creator, “Language of the Stones”; Co-Founder/Brazilian Team and Director, “Engage Earth” Art Education Project; Multimedia Artist, Public and Performance Art; Photographer; & Author; Denise Milan Studio, San Paulo, Brazil. (In-Studio)*

Dr. Jerome I. Friedman, Physics Professor Emeritus, and Nobel Laureate 1990 in Physics, Institute Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Member, Board of Sponsors, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, (By Skype)*,

Dr. Jeffreen M. Hayes, Principal, bridge/arts of Chicago, Curator, Scholar, and Educator, (By Skype)*,

Dr. Naomi H. Moniz, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Brazilian Studies, & Comparative Literature, Georgetown University (Ret.), (By Skype)*.

For reference, also watch Brazil Institute’s Mist of the Earth: Art and Sustainability event here.

27 Reminders Why Brazil Is On Everyone’s Bucket List

Gabriela Kruschewsky – The Huffington Post, 7/15/2015

It has crossed your mind at least once … You, Brazil, a beach, sipping on some fresh coconut water that an endearing elderly man probably just chopped open for you with a machete — sun, relaxation, beauty.

Whether you’ve been dreaming of experiencing Carnaval in the South American paradise for years, or you’re just really thirsty for an ice-cold caipirinha, let’s face it. This country has most likely crept its way onto your travel bucket list.

Yes, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo are both beautiful, but which other places should you visit when in Brazil? Voila — here are some gems that you’ll want on your radar for your next trip. Ready. Set. Brazil.

Read more…



Brazil World Cup stadiums symbol of tournament’s dubious legacy

Vivek Chaudhary – ESPN FC, 6/20/2015

As Brazil marks one year since hosting the World Cup, it reflects on the tournament’s checkered legacy. More than $3 billion was spent on building five new stadiums and renovating seven existing ones, but many of these so-called white elephants are as likely now to collect dust as they are to generate ticket receipts.

“When I look back on the 2014 World Cup, it is not good,” the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, Eduardo Paes, told ESPN FC. “Brazil was left with some great stadiums, but they were too expensive because of corruption.

“Brazilians have not benefited from the tournament. There has been no legacy for them. The World Cup still makes them angry. There is regret that we even staged it.”

Read more… 

The Outlook of Brazil’s October Elections by the Country’s Leading Pollster


During the Brazil Institute’s event on July 29, 2014, Mauro Paulino and Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva provided their insight on the upcoming Presidential elections in Brazil. Paulino, through his work with the prominent Brazil-based research institute, Datafolha, revealed past as well as present statistics and predictions to shed light on the development of voter intention in the upcoming October elections.

The general electorate in Brazil is younger and more educated than it was in the past, leading to a higher distrust in political parties. The speakers note that because of this, the current candidates would do well in distancing themselves from the government and its reputation for corruption by offering a new and separate alternative, but it is unknown as to whether or not this will come to fruition.

Paulino points out a Brazilian anomaly in that although television time is generally thought to enhance candidates’ chances of getting elected, this notion is statistically not true in Brazil. This-coming election also holds the largest percentage of people who are currently unsure for whom they would vote or who would not select any of the candidates by submitting a blank vote. Continue reading “The Outlook of Brazil’s October Elections by the Country’s Leading Pollster”