Bugging in Brazil Exposes Fear of Biggest Betrayal Yet

Brazil’s crusading corruption investigation is winding down

Sabrina Valle and Jessica Brice – Bloomberg, 05/04/2016

The crusading federal judge behind Brazil’s explosive corruption investigation, facing the limits of his mandate and signs of political pushback, sees his role in the case winding down by the end of the year, a turning point in a probe that has helped push the president to the brink of impeachment.

For more than two years, Judge Sergio Moro and his team of prosecutors and police in the southern town of Curitiba have tracked the $1.8-billion graft scandal across four continents. They uncovered a crime ring so epic that it shattered Brazil’s political and economic leadership and helped tip the nation into its worst recession in a century.

Now, legal challenges are chipping away at Moro’s jurisdiction over executives amid criticism that he’s over-reaching. Brazilian law also bars him from going after sitting politicians accused of graft. So he expects significantly fewer new operations under his watch starting next year, according to three top officials who asked not to be named relaying details from private conversations. The press-shy judge declined to comment.

Read More…



Brazil protests: Rousseff and Lula supporters rally amid corruption claims

Bruce Douglas – The Guardian, 03/18/16

At the end of a week of extraordinary political drama, constitutional chaos and massive anti-government protests, supporters of Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and her predecessor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, will rally in cities across the country on Friday.

The Frente Brasil Popular, a network of trade unions, social movements and other organisations sympathetic to the ruling Partido dos Trabalhadores (PT) said it would hold events in 45 cities in defence of democracy and the rights of the working class.

It will mark the first major show of strength by Brazil’s pro-government factions since an estimated 3 million people took to the streets on Sunday to demand the president’s resignation.

Read More…


Brazil justice minister to quit as Lula probe tension grows: papers

Jeb Blount, Anthony Boadle, Michael Perry – Reuters, 02/29/2016

Brazil’s Justice Minister Jose Eduardo Cardoso plans to resign, fed up with rising attacks from his Workers’ Party over a police probe into the activities of former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, two Brazilian newspapers reported Sunday.

Cardoso will quit this week, Folha de S.Paulo said. Cardoso, who took office with Lula’s PT successor Dilma Rousseff at the beginning of her first term in 2011.

Leading members of Cardoso’s party, known by its Portuguese initials PT, have raised pressure on the minister in recent days after Lula was notified that Brazilian courts plan to subpoena his bank, telephone and financial records, Folha and the Estado de S.Paulo reported.

Read More…



Lava Jato changes the justice and the law

Joaquim Falcão – Folha de S. Paulo, 7/31/2015

Major investigations on corruption are changing Brazil’s justice system for the better.

A new, pragmatic generation of judges, prosecutors and police investigators put facts above doctrine. Brazil’s criminal Justice will not be the same after the Mensalão scandal – a congressional vote buying scheme tried in the country’s Supreme Court in 2012 – and the ongoing Lava Jato operation on massive fraud committed against state oil giant Petrobras. The unprecedented sentencing to jail terms of previously powerful government officials and members of Congress, in the Mensalão case, has created expectations and voters pressure for outcomes in the more serious Petrolão scandal.

Changes have occurred both in the practice of law by judges, prosecutors, investigators and lawyers, as well as in the doctrines and the courts, reflecting a generational change among Brazilian federal judges, prosecutors, and investigators. They are younger and have joined the judicial system at an earlier stage of their lives. They grew up in era of era of democracy and freedom of the press, decadence of traditional political parties and a society increasingly indignant about private appropriation of public goods. They are prone to protect the public’s interest and have no fear to carry out their constitutional duties.

Read original article in Portuguese here

Lava Jato Investigations will continue, as painful as it may be

Eliane Cantanhêde and Andreza Matais – O Estado de S.Paulo, 7/04/2015

Andre Dusek/Estadao

Photo by Andre Dusek/Estadao

A man of few words, the director-general of the Federal Brazilian Police, Leandro Daiello came out of anonymity to state, in an interview to Estado that no one will be exempt from the law. The ongoing investigations will proceed even if they lead to President Rousseff or former President Lula, he said. “We investigate facts, not people. Where those facts take us is a consequence of the investigation itself, as painful as it may be”.

Originally from the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, Daiello has been and director-general of the Brazilian equivalent to the FBI since 2011. He used the expression “as painful as it may be” three times during the interview, to make clear that the Federal Police is an independent institution with solid rules of conduct, and that investigations are to continue “with or without José Eduardo Cardozo as justice minister, and with or without Daiello leading the Federal Police”.

Continue reading “Lava Jato Investigations will continue, as painful as it may be”

Brazil opens inquiry into claims of wrongdoing by ex-president

Simon Romero – The New York Times, 04/06/2013

Brazil’s Public Ministry, a body of independent public prosecutors, has begun an investigation into a claim connecting former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva to a vast vote-buying scheme that involved the channeling of funds to the governing Workers’ Party.

The inquiry, which was announced in the capital, Brasília, on Friday and comes after several months of analyzing testimony, opens a new phase in what has arguably been Brazil’s largest corruption scandal, already involving the conviction of Mr. da Silva’s powerful former chief of staff, José Dirceu de Oliveira e Silva, on conspiracy and bribery charges last year.

The move by the Public Ministry, which asked the federal police to carry out the investigation, is thought to be the first time that Mr. da Silva has been directly investigated in connection to the scheme, called the mensalão, or big monthly allowance, for the regular payments that some lawmakers received. The scandal emerged in 2005, during Mr. da Silva’s first term as president. At 67, he remains a towering figure in Brazilian politics.

Read more…