Fiji and Brazil pursue close cooperation

July 18, 2014

Islands Business, 7/18/2014

Fiji’s Ambassador to Brazil Cama Tuiloma signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Political Consultations with the Brazilian Minister for External Relations, Luiz Figueiredo in Brasilia this week.

The MOU is an instrument for developing a dialogue mechanism to enhance and expand bilateral relations and cooperation between Fiji and Brazil. Under the MOU, the two countries will maintain periodic consultations on bilateral issues and mechanisms to promote and diversify cooperation for their mutual benefits including regional and international matters of common interest.

The MOU is in line with Fiji’s Foreign Policy of enhancing engagement with the international community while complementing initiatives on South-South Cooperation.

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The goal of projecting the country overseas is still a distant one

June 23, 2014

Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva – Folha de S. Paulo, 5/31/2014

carlos_eduardo_lins_da_silva-230x310

Ten years ago on August 18th, with then President Lula in the audience, the Brazilian national soccer team with Ronaldo and Ronaldinho Gaúcho, beat Haiti in Port au Prince 6-0 in what was called the “Match of Peace.”

The event symbolized the Brazilian presence as the head of the UN mission in Haiti since 2004.

President Lula’s decision to accept this mission had to do with his ambition to project the country in the international stage as a first class actor even in areas that do not align with the country’s innate geopolitical interests.

Among the objectives on this agenda was gaining a permanent seat on the UN Security Council.

Lula’s willingness to take the lead with MINUSTAH was very well received by the U.S. Administration under George W. Bush.

Haiti, an extremely unstable and poor country, has been an issue of concern for Washington due to its geographical location, ever since its independence in 1804. Read the rest of this entry »


FACT SHEET: The U.S.-Brazil Bilateral Relationship

June 18, 2014

The White House, 6/17/2014

Vice President Biden traveled to Brazil to attend the first United States World Cup game and to meet with President Dilma Rousseff and Vice-President Michel Temer to discuss our countries’ broad and multifaceted bilateral relationship.

Growing Economic Cooperation

The United States and Brazil engage regularly in a number of formal dialogues and working groups on economic issues.  These consultations are contributing to two-way goods and services trade that exceeded $100 billion in 2013.  The United States has foreign direct investment in Brazil totaling roughly $80 billion and Brazilian foreign direct investment in the United States is rising, reaching approximately $14 billion in 2012.

The U.S. Secretary of the Treasury recently visited Brazil for discussions on bilateral and global economic and financial issues, reflecting the two countries’ increasingly shared stake in promoting strong, sustainable, and balanced global economic growth and job creation.  In May, the U.S. Secretary of Transportation visited Brazil to meet with Brazilian counterparts on land, air, and waterway transportation cooperation that can facilitate trade and travel.  The continued exchange of high-level official delegations underscores the two countries’ commitment to building a mutually-beneficial economic partnership.

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Brazil urgently needs a new foreign policy

March 24, 2014

The Economist, 3/23/2014

Since it is the only big power in South America, Brazil inevitably catches the eye of outsiders looking for a country to take the lead in resolving the region’s conflicts—such as the one raging in the streets of Venezuela.

Yet leader is not a role that Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s president, is keen to play. She has reasons for her reluctance—and they explain why Brazilian foreign policy has run into trouble.

Ms Rousseff has behaved as a loyal ally to the elected, but autocratic, government of Nicolás Maduro, which faces opposition protests almost daily. Brazil worked hard to thwart any role in Venezuela for the Organisation of American States, which includes the United States. Instead, the foreign ministers of the South American Union (UNASUR) have agreed to promote talks in Venezuela. It is an initiative without teeth: the ministers expressed their solidarity with Mr Maduro, disqualifying themselves as honest brokers in the opposition’s eyes.

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The bets that failed

March 21, 2014

The Economist, 3/22/2014

SINCE it is the only big power in South America, Brazil inevitably catches the eye of outsiders looking for a country to take the lead in resolving the region’s conflicts—such as the one raging in the streets of Venezuela. Yet leader is not a role that Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s president, is keen to play. She has reasons for her reluctance—and they explain why Brazilian foreign policy has run into trouble.

Ms Rousseff has behaved as a loyal ally to the elected, but autocratic, government of Nicolás Maduro, which faces opposition protests almost daily. Brazil worked hard to thwart any role in Venezuela for the Organisation of American States, which includes the United States. Instead, the foreign ministers of the South American Union (UNASUR) have agreed to promote talks in Venezuela. It is an initiative without teeth: the ministers expressed their solidarity with Mr Maduro, disqualifying themselves as honest brokers in the opposition’s eyes.

Brazil’s wrong-headed calculation is that the protests will fizzle out. Mr Maduro took a UNASUR statement on March 12th as a green light to launch another crackdown. Faced with a deteriorating economy and mounting unpopularity, Mr Maduro’s rule is likely to remain repressive. Given that Brazil’s ruling Workers’ Party (PT) claims to stand for democracy and human rights, he is a strange ally.

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Brazil in 2014: Will Rousseff change course?

January 7, 2014

Paulo Soter0 – CNN, 12/30/2013

Editor’s note: Paulo Sotero is director of the Wilson Center Brazil Institute. The views expressed are his own. This is the latest in the ‘14 in 2014‘ series, looking at what the year ahead holds for key countries.

Three consecutive years of disappointing economic performance, with an average GDP growth of barely 2 percent and deteriorating fiscal and external accounts, should be enough to convince President Dilma Rousseff to move Brazil away from the inward policies and micromanaging style she introduced after succeeding her popular mentor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, in January 2011. The same mindset has affected Brazil’s international affairs, with similar results.

A leader with little appetite or patience for diplomacy and focused by necessity on domestic challenges, Rousseff implemented a modest foreign policy agenda when compared to her predecessor and became the first Brazilian president to fire a foreign minister, over a preventable incident. There are both negative and positive incentives for Rousseff to change course as she faces reelection in October 2014.

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The Brazil-U.S. benign neglect myth

October 31, 2013

João Augusto de Castro Neves – FGV/IBRE,10/2013

Weeks of speculation came to an end when President Dilma Rousseff decided to cancel her state visit to the United States in October due to allegations that the US National Security Agency had been intercepting government communications. The decision definitely struck a nerve, especially because it would’ve been the first state visit of a Brazilian head of state to the US in nearly two decades.
The goal of the trip was to find something that would catapult bilateral engagement to a new level, like a roadmap for a trade agreement or talks on UN Security Council reform, but now policy makers in Brasilia and in Washington are working to prevent the relationship from deteriorating even further.

For starters, the risks to US companies operating in sensitive sectors with political and even operational constraints have increased considerably. This is chiefly the case in defense, telecom/IT, and energy sectors. Cooperation in defense will most likely be affected, with Boeing’s chances of securing a contract to sell fighter jets to the Brazilian Air Force being significantly reduced. The caveat is that a decision on the bidding process is not imminent, given the fiscal constraints that the Brazilian government is currently facing. As such, instead of openly disqualifying Boeing, Rousseff opted to delay the entire process further.

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